Program Components

Study Environment

With more than 60 years’ experience in the Middle East and North Africa, AMIDEAST students benefit from the organization’s long-term experience, strong regional connections, and deep understanding of local culture. AMIDEAST Education Abroad Programs provide students with wide-ranging opportunities to interact with local university students and to gain the most from intercultural encounters on semester, academic-year, short-term, and summer study abroad experiences in Arab countries.

Study Abroad: 

Student Support


Pre-Departure Information

As part of our effort to ensure students grow both intellectually and inter-culturally during their time abroad, AMIDEAST provides in-depth information in preparation for the program. AMIDEAST staff distributes pre-departure information through the AMIDEAST Student Portal. This pre-departure information addresses topics such as:

  • flight information;
  • academic matters;
  • visas;
  • insurance, safety, and security;
  • country-specific student handbooks outlining the logistics of the program; and
  • background on a host-country’s history, society, and culture.

In addition to material provided on the AMIDEAST Student Portal, students also participate in an online pre-departure orientation with AMIDEAST staff. This orientation allows students to ask any pre-departure questions directly to AMIDEAST/HQ program staff.  Program staff are also available by phone and email throughout the pre-departure process in order to assist students with their program preparations. 

In-Country Orientation

Once in the host country, student participate in an orientation that  includes instruction and discussion about cultural adjustment, program components, academic advising, goals, expectations, safety, survival language instruction, and host city exploration.

Semester Programs: Upon arrival in host city, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program students participate in an in-depth, week-long orientation designed to introduce them to the culture and daily life of their host country and to familiarize them with program logistics. Students stay in a hotel during orientation, and move to their accommodation for the semester at the end of the first week. The orientation combines structured informational sessions with organized activities and free time for participants to familiarize themselves with the host city. Topics such as safety and health, family life, cultural adaptation, program regulations, participant responsibilities and other essential information are all discussed during orientation. During the on-site orientation students also meet their professors, receive final language placements, and become familiar with the program’s IT environment.

Summer/Short Term: Upon arrival in host city, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program students participate in a one-and-a-half day orientation designed to introduce them to the culture and daily life of the host country, and to familiarize them with logistics of the program. The orientation combines structured informational sessions with organized activities. Topics such as safety and health, family life, cultural adjustment, program regulations, participant responsibilities and other essential information are all discussed during orientation.

Staff

AMIDEAST programs are supported by a well-trained and diverse staff of Americans and host-country nationals in the host country and in the Washington D.C. headquarters office. This team of education abroad professionals provides students with health & safety, academic, language acquisition, intercultural development, cultural adjustment, and logistical support. In addition to student support, these staff members work with local faculty to develop quality Arabic and Area Studies courses.

For more information about AMIDEAST staff members, visit our Staff page.

Health & Safety

With AMIDEAST’s more than 60-year presence in the Middle East and North Africa, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Programs are able to draw on AMIDEAST’s long-term experience in the region, strong local connections, and deep understanding of the intercultural, health, safety, and security issues inherent to study in the Arab world.

As part of the program fee, AMIDEAST provides medical and accident insurance for all students through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). In addition to medical insurance, AMIDEAST education abroad students are provided with security and natural disaster evacuation services through CISI. AMIDEAST has also contracted with an intelligence provider to assist with monitoring, protecting against, and responding to security issues in the region.

For more information on AMIDEAST's approach to Health and Safety, please click here.

Ongoing Program Support

During the AMIDEAST Program, in-country staff are always available to support students. From cultural adjustment concerns to ensuring students are staying safe and healthy on the program, in-country staff members go above and beyond to provide a safe and enriching environment for students.

Some examples of ongoing program support from in-country AMIDEAST staff include:

  • Accompanying students to the doctor when ill and assisting with the health insurance reimbursement process,
  • Getting to know students though one-on-one and group meetings throughout the program.
  • Arranging various cultural activities throughout the program to deepen student understanding of local society.
  • Organizing and accompanying students on program-arranged excursions outside of the host city.
  • Being a highly accessible resource: students are always welcome to stop by staff offices in the AMIDEAST Center to discuss questions or concerns.
  • Working with local authorities and AMIDEAST staff in Washington, D.C. to promote student safety and security in the host country.
Post-Program Support

After finishing the AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program, students receive continued support from staff in Washington, D.C. AMIDEAST supports alumni in the following ways:

  • Answering grade report and transcript questions, including sending copies of official grade reports to parties at the student’s request.
  • Providing syllabi from classes taken while on the program to assist in the credit transfer process.
  • Offering enrollment verification for any scholarship-granting or background-check organizations.
  • Planning alumni activities and publishing alumni newsletters throughout the year to keep students engaged with the Arab world.
  • Offering internship opportunities at the Washington D.C. office.
Visa Information

U.S. citizens do not require a pre‐obtained visa to enter Morocco or Jordan. Once in country, AMIDEAST staff will assist students with the visa renewal process if necessary. Students receive detailed information about the visa process during pre-departure planning.

If you have any questions regarding visas prior to acceptance, please email EdAbroad@amideast.org.

Language Acquisition

Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic are offered at multiple levels on semester and summer programs and accommodate students from beginning to advanced proficiencies.  On semester programs, Media Arabic is also offered as an elective for those students who wish to deepen their focus on Arabic language during a semester abroad. For the Regional Studies in French semester program, students may also choose Modern Standard Arabic or Media Arabic as electives.


Intercultural Learning

AMIDEAST Education Abroad Programs are structured to include opportunities for students to develop greater intercultural competence. Using five frameworks – language use; non-verbal behavior; communication style; perceptual style; and cultural assumptions and values – as key windows for understanding cultural difference, students on AMIDEAST programs are encouraged to look under the surface of inter-personal interactions and search for deeper understanding of how host country nationals perceive the world around them. 


Cultural Dialogue Sessions

During semester programs, Education Abroad students participate in structured dialogue sessions with carefully-selected host country peers from local universities. Held either in informal small groups or as larger speaker-led discussions, cultural dialogue sessions provide an opportunity for Education Abroad students to discuss cultural issues and interact with host country peers.

AMIDEAST staff members strive to create a “safe space” for both Education Abroad and host country students to express their views and ask questions. These unique environments allow participants to discuss challenging topics that require contemplation and reflection, and promotes intercultural learning. Some of the topics that may be discussed during these cultural dialogue sessions include perspectives on identity, marriage, religion, and gender roles.

“I learned the ability to empathize, understanding another opinion from the perspective and circumstances of another. This skill was taught through dialogues and interactions with Jordanians facilitated by the excellent AMIDEAST staff.”
-  Jordan 2013 Student

Language Partners

In each host country, AMIDEAST field staff recruits local students, young professionals, and participants in AMIDEAST English-language courses to act as language partners for AMIDEAST students. During both in-class and extra-curricular activities, Education Abroad students work with host-country peers to practice language and build cross-cultural understanding.  Language partners are a core element of the Arabic language learning agenda of those programs.

Reflection Period

All AMIDEAST Education Abroad semester/academic year programs include a "Reflection Week" at the end of the term. Summer students will participate in a “Reflection Day” at the end of the program.

Over the years, AMIDEAST has found that at the end of the program, students often feel a great deal of excitement and anxiety about returning home. Reflection periods have been designed in order to create the time and space for students to slow down, look back on their experience, and plan for their return home.

While many students reflect informally during their time abroad, structured reflection helps improve intercultural learning and personal development. Structured reflection aims to help students step back from the everyday challenges and struggles of living abroad, and reexamine the bigger picture.  Further, reflection at the end of the program helps students apply the lessons they have learned in the classroom, from their friends, and from their daily lives abroad to their world back home.  Recent research has shown that without cultural mentoring and structured reflection students do not increase their intercultural competence at the same rates as those who do receive such structured ways to examine their experiences. Structured reflection allows students to take a step back from the everyday challenges and struggles of living abroad, and reexamine the bigger picture. 

AMIDEAST uses this part of the program to create the time and space for students to slow down, look back on their experience, and plan for their return home. 

The purposes of Reflection Week/Day are to provide students with opportunities to:

  1. reflect on academic learning that took place in each of their courses
  2. reflect on their own intercultural learning via guided activities organized by the programming staff 
  3. have closure to their experience with
    • their classmates (who they will not be with again, perhaps ever, as they return to their home campuses),
    • the friends they have made in the local community,
    • their host families, and
    • the places they have come to know and love.
  4. prepare for their re-entry to their home country

“I very much appreciate having had the opportunity to come to a sort of closure while still in-country. On my journey home I sat next to two students from a program in Germany who expressed their sadness at having to leave the country one day after their final exams. The Reflection Period helped me organize my thoughts about the semester before I even left, and gave me the opportunity to spend time with the people and places I had come to know during that time.”
– Fall 2014 Jordan Student


 

Housing and Meals


Jordan Semester Programs

Host families or AMIDEAST student apartments are available to semester students in Jordan.

Students enrolled in the AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program in Amman, Jordan have a choice of living arrangements and meal plans:

OPTION 1: Living with a Jordanian Family – students who select this option will live with a Jordanian family that has been carefully screened by AMIDEAST/Jordan from a group of qualified applicants. Families generally host two AMIDEAST students at a time. All host families are Arabic-speaking; English, however, is spoken in many of the homes.

AMIDEAST matches students with host families using a variety of criteria. While all placement preferences may not be met in every case, AMIDEAST will strive to make the best match to ensure a rewarding and pleasant living experience. If an issue arises, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program staff members will be available either to mediate or to arrange a new host family placement.  Students living with host families will be provided with all meals by their host families but may find that some days it is not possible to return to the family for lunch because of class schedules.

OPTION 2: Living in a shared apartment with other students from the program.  The apartments are vetted by AMIDEAST for their safety and are selected based on their comfort and their convenient access to program facilities and public transportation. Students purchase or prepare meals on their own.
 

Jordan Summer Programs

All AMIDEAST Education Abroad students live with a Jordanian Family during summer programs. Jordanian families have been carefully screened by AMIDEAST/Jordan from a database of qualified applicants. Students usually are placed with a roommate from the AMIDEAST program into families who have previous experience hosting American students through AMIDEAST. All host families are Arabic-speaking; English, however, is spoken in many of the homes.

While all placement preferences may not be met in every case, AMIDEAST will strive to make the best match to ensure a rewarding and pleasant living experience. In the event of a problem, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program staff members will be available either to mediate or to arrange a new host family placement.

Morocco Semester and Summer Programs

All AMIDEAST Education Abroad students live with Moroccan families. Moroccan families have been carefully screened by AMIDEAST/Morocco from a database of qualified applicants. Students usually are placed with a roommate from the AMIDEAST program into families who have previous experience hosting American students through AMIDEAST. Most host family members speak Arabic as a first language and also speak French; a small number of family members also speak Spanish or Amazigh (Berber) as well. While all placement preferences may not be met in every case, AMIDEAST will strive to make the best match to ensure a rewarding and pleasant living experience. In the event of a problem, AMIDEAST Education Abroad Program staff members will be available either to mediate or to arrange a new host family placement. Students living with host families will be given a stipend for lunch, as often class schedules prohibit students from return to their host families for lunch.

Students with special circumstances who may have concerns about living with a host family should contact AMIDEAST at DocsEdAbroad@amideast.org. AMIDEAST may be able to explore alternate housing options on a case-by-case basis.
 

Excursions

Traveling within your host country is an exciting, immersive way to experience the various regional cultures, different geographical landscapes, and even UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Just as people in New York City live very differently from people on the plains of Kansas, different parts of your host country may stand in sharp contrast to one another. Program-organized excursions provide students a way to experience the Arab World first-hand, taking them places they might not otherwise be able to go.


Jordan Semester Excursions

Amman City Tour:

The Amman City Tour is part of students’ first week in Jordan and is designed to highlight different areas in the host city that will be of interest to the student while staying in Jordan. The tour covers parts of the city that would be most accessible and frequented by the students starting from locations around the AMIDEAST center. The areas covered in the city tour also include historic and modern landmarks of the city such as the Roman Theater, the Citadel, and areas that area home to the city’s main shopping centers and malls. Students board a bus with AMIDEAST staff and a local guide who provide a combination of useful day-to-day tips and historical background about the city.  Students typically have the chance to explore the Citadel and Roman Theater during the first half of the tour.  They then board the bus again to learn the layout of the parts of the city that they will be navigating most over the course of the program.

Southern Jordan: Wadi Rum and Petra

Excursions to Southern Jordan have included trips to Wadi Rum (in English, Valley of the Moon) and the ancient city of Petra. Visits to these locations give students a glimpse into Jordan’s Bedouin cultural roots. At Wadi Rum, students typically take a Jeep tour led by local Bedouin guides. In the past, students have been able to hike and explore different parts of the desert valley. The desert of Wadi Rum is dotted with massive mountains colored in shades of red, yellow, and orange. These mountains open up and give way to breathtaking panoramas.  After sunset, students may spend the night at traditional Bedouin-style camps where they sit around a campfire drinking tea, listening to local guides sing and play a traditional Arab lute, and learning to debkah, a group dance performed at large celebrations. For dinner, Bedouin guides typically prepare zarb, a meal of barbecued meat and vegetables cooked in a sand pit.  Many students remark at the beauty of spending a night under the stars in such a wide and beautiful desert.

The next morning, students usually visit the ancient Nabatean city of Petra, one of Jordan’s most well-known tourist attractions and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The visit to Petra typically begins with a guided tour through the first section of the ancient city to provide students with rich historical background.  After refueling at a restaurant in the center of the park, students have spent the afternoon exploring Petra’s many trails and monuments on their own.  Petra's most famous monument, the Treasury, appears dramatically at the end of the siq, carved directly from the rose-colored chasm walls. Various walks and climbs reveal hundreds of buildings, tombs, baths, funerary halls, temples, arched gateways, colonnaded streets, and haunting rock drawings – as well as a 3000-seat open air theater, a gigantic first-century monastery, and a modern archeological museum, all of which students can explore at their leisure to take in the history of the area.

Northern Jordan: Jerash and Ajloun

Previous trips to northern Jordan have included visits to the ancient Greco-Roman city of Jerash and Ajloun Castle, a strategic Crusades-era fortress, offering a glimpse of the numerous civilizations that have occupied Jordan. Students typically spend the morning touring and exploring Jerash, one of Jordan’s most popular tourist destinations. A city with over 6,500 years of human history, Jerash’s golden age came under Roman rule. It is now considered one of the best-preserved Roman provincial towns in the world, after being excavated and restored for the past 70 years. Ancient Jerash includes impressive theaters, plazas, paved colonnaded roads, temples, and much more – all only a slice of what archeologists believe lies buried under the modern city. Modern Jerash is a fascinating blend of cultures, due in large part to the waves of immigrants who settled in the city in the second half of the twentieth century.

After enjoying a group lunch at one of Jerash’s most popular local restaurants, students typically head to Ajloun Castle (also known as Qal'at ar-Rabad), which was originally an important fort protecting communication routes between the Euphrates and Cairo. Built in 1184 A.D. by 'Izz ad-Din Usama bin Munqidh, a general of Saladin, who defeated Europeran Crusaders in 1187 A.D. Today, it is a splendid sight with a fascinating collection of towers, chambers, and staircases to explore. Its hilltop position offers stunning views of the Jordan Valley, and its presence is a reminder to students of Jordan’s historical importance on the trade routes of the Middle East.  The visit to Ajloun Castle typically begins with a brief guided tour to provide background information about the site, followed by free time for students to explore the corridors of the castle on their own.

Biblical Jordan: Madaba, Mount Nebo, and the Dead Sea

The Biblical Jordan excursion is designed to give students a glimpse into Jordan’s importance in Abrahamic religions and their cultures. Past Biblical Jordan excursions have included visits to the town of Madaba, with its Church of Saint George and Archeological Park, Mount Nebo, the Baptism Site, and the Dead Sea. These sites provide students with a glimpse of life outside Amman while teaching them about the region’s religious history, which has had a lasting impact on Jordanian culture and politics. Students have visited the Greek Orthodox Church of Saint George in Madaba, which houses a sixth-century mosaic map of Jerusalem and the Holy Land – the oldest surviving religious map of the Holy Land in any form. The Madaba Archaeological Park, another favorite among students, contains historic mosaics moved there by the Jordanian government for protection and display.

A short drive away is Mount Nebo. Many Christians believe it is from here that Moses viewed the Holy Land of Canaan. On a clear day, students can see the Dead Sea, the Jordan River Valley, the city of Jericho, and even the distant hills of Jerusalem. Since the Biblical Jordan excursion typically takes place at the end of the semester, students and program staff take advantage of the peaceful atmosphere of Mt. Nebo to begin the reflection process.  Students spend time on their own thinking back over the semester and everything they have learned while on the AMIDEAST program. 

Excursions have additionally visited a place known by Christians as the Baptism Site, also called Bethany Beyond the Jordan, where many believe Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist. After visiting the Baptism Site, students often spend time floating in the Dead Sea, where they can experience the therapeutic benefits of the sea’s famed mineral mud, as well as relax by the swimming pools and enjoy the sun.  On semester programs, students typically spend the night at the Dead Sea, which allows for plenty of free time to enjoy the water and participate in group reflection activities as students prepare for the end of the program and their return home. 

Morocco Semester Excursions

Morocco’s Cultural Heart: Fes

Excursions to Fes open a direct window into a place many Moroccans consider the country’s cultural and religious capital. One of Morocco’s four “imperial cities,” Fes is the country’s third-largest city and has been called the "Mecca of the West" and the "Athens of Africa." Fes el Bali (in English, Old Fes), the city’s oldest district, is believed to be the world’s largest car-free urban area, with a population around 156,000.

Past excursions have included extensive time for students to explore Fes’s famously complex medina. The city was originally founded as the capital of the Idrisid dynasty between 789 and 808 A.D., and has grown through many subsequent dynasties and governments. Of the many attractions in the city, one of the most magnificent is the El-Attarine Madrasa (in English, school), which was built by the Merenid dynasty between the years 1323 and 1325 A.D.
Students have taken guided tours of the school, learning about its history, including its magnificently-decorated central courtyard, with suwar (verses of the Quran) engraved in wood and plaster. The courtyard’s fountain and marble columns are embellished with beautiful zellij (tiled mosaic) a typical feature of the region’s historic architecture.

In addition to these experiences, students have stayed outside Fes el Bali in a modern hotel and taken day trips into the old city to explore attractions such as the city’s palaces, its mellah (Jewish quarter), and its famous tanneries. Excursions have included a mix of guided tours and free time to ensure students have the chance to learn about and experience Fes’s deep traditions and culture.

Mountain Life: Zaouiat Ahansal

Excursions to Zaouiat Ahansal are a way for students to experience a side of Moroccan life very different from the way people in the country’s major cities live. Zaouiat Ahansal is a rural region in the High Atlas Mountains. One of Morocco’s many isolated areas, the region is predominantly inhabited by Amazigh (meaning “free people” in the indigenous language, commonly known as Berber in the West) peoples.

On past excursions to Zaouiat Ahansal, students have stayed in guesthouses in the village of Aggudim under the auspices of the Atlas Cultural Foundation, an American non-profit that works with the people of Zaouiat Ahansal on sustainable development projects. Because of its historical location on a major caravan route into Marrakesh, the region was a center of religious thought, and it is named after Saint Sidi Said Ahansal. Zaouiat Ahansal was one of the last regions in Morocco to fall to the French Protectorate, a fact that has influenced its history ever since.

Today, the region is centered on four small villages sheltered by beautiful mountains. In addition to learning about the Atlas Cultural Foundation’s work, past students on this excursion have had the opportunity to hike in the mountains, volunteer at an English tutoring program, meet Moroccans who live in this breathtaking region, and participate in a feast including fresh food, music, and dancing at the local sheikh’s house. This excursion provides an amazing immersion into Morocco’s varied cultural past and how that continues to affect the country’s development today.

Morocco Summer Excursions

Experiencing Ancient Rome in North Africa: Meknes and Volubilis

The Meknes and Volubilis day trip is designed to give students a glimpse into Morocco’s rich and diverse cultural heritage. Founded by local Amazigh (Berber) tribes, Meknes became a refuge for Andalusian refugees. The city reached its peak under Alaouite rule during which Sultan Moulay Ismail meshed traditional Islamic and European architecture to create a uniquely Moorish style. The site of Volubilis exposes students to the relics of Morocco’s Phoenician, Carthaginian, and Roman culture. Although the site fell into disrepair, it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1996 after large-scale excavations.

Day Trip to Assilah

Just an hour south of Tangier, the white-washed coastal city of Assilah is one of the locations for a summer program day-trip. This small town was once a haven for Barbary pirates who utilized the port to control Portuguese, Spanish, and French trade in the Mediterranean and Atlantic. Now, the walled-city is occupied by Moroccans, Spanish expatriates, and some of the most beautiful libraries in North Africa

Jordan Summer Excursions

Amman City Tour:

The Amman City Tour is part of students’ first week in Jordan and is designed to highlight different areas in the host city that will be of interest to the student while staying in Jordan. The tour covers parts of the city that would be most accessible and frequented by the students starting from locations around the AMIDEAST center. The areas covered in the city tour also include historic and modern landmarks of the city such as the Roman Theater, the Citadel, and areas that are home to the city’s main shopping centers and malls. Students board a bus with AMIDEAST staff and a local guide who provide a combination of useful day-to-day tips and historical background about the city.  Students typically have the chance to explore the Citadel and Roman Theater during the first half of the tour.  They then board the bus again to learn the layout of the parts of the city that they will be navigating most over the course of the program.

Biblical Excursion:

The Biblical Jordan excursion takes students on a trip to explore historic sites in Jordan that are main tourist attractions and are linked to all the Abrahamic faiths, with all three locations tied to Christianity and biblical history. The excursion includes visits to the city of Madaba with its Church of Saint George and the Archeological Park, Mount Nebo and the Dead Sea. A guide typically accompanies program staff and participants to provide background historical information, which is balanced with free time for students to explore the sites.  
Madaba is a quaint town that was an ecclesiastical center between the 4th and 7th centuries AD- producing some of the world’s finest collections of Byzantine mosaics, many of which are well preserved. Previously the students typically stroll through the town and visited the Greek Orthodox Church of Saint George in Madaba, wWhere a 6th- century- AD mosaic map of Jerusalem and the Holy Land is exhibited – the earliest religious map of the Holy Land in any form to survive from antiquity. Next, students usually visit the Madaba Archaeological Park, which contains many mosaics and the remains of a Byzantine Villa and the Church of the Virgin Mary.

A short drive away is Mount Nebo. From here, it is believed Moses viewed the Holy Land of Canaan that he would never enter. He died and was buried in Moab, "in the valley opposite Beth-peor". The exact location of his tomb remains unknown. Mount Nebo became a place of pilgrimage for early Christians from Jerusalem and a small church was built there in the 4th century to commemorate the end of Moses' life. The church was subsequently expanded in the 5th and 6th centuries into the present-day large basilica with its stunning collection of Byzantine mosaics. On a clear day students can see the Dead Sea, the Jordan River Valley, Jericho and the distant hills of Jerusalem.

Students end their excursion at the Dead Sea where they have the chance to float in the water and try the famous Dead Sea mud, as well as relax by swimming pools and enjoy the sun before heading back to the capital.

North Excursion: Jerash and Ajloun

The Northern Excursion typically takes students to the city of Jerash, which is one of Jordan’s main tourist destinations. A city that has had human civilization for over 6,500 years, its golden age came under Roman rule and is now generally considered one of the best preserved Roman provincial towns in the world. Students get to explore the old ruins and city on foot and hear about the fascinating history of this part of Jordan. For centuries it was hidden underground, but over the past 70 years it has been excavated and restored. Jerash includes impressive theaters, plazas, paved colonnaded roads, temples and much more; and all this is only part of what is believed to lie buried under the modern city.

After enjoying a group lunch at one of Jerash’s most popular local restaurants, students typically head to Ajloun Castle (also known as Qal'at ar-Rabad), which was originally an important fort protecting communication routes between the Euphrates and Cairo. Built in 1184 A.D. by 'Izz ad-Din Usama bin Munqidh, a general of Saladin, who defeated Europeran Crusaders in 1187 A.D. Today, it is a splendid sight with a fascinating collection of towers, chambers, and staircases to explore. Its hilltop position offers stunning views of the Jordan Valley, and its presence is a reminder to students of Jordan’s historical importance on the trade routes of the Middle East.  The visit to Ajloun Castle typically begins with a brief guided tour to provide background information about the site, followed by free time for students to explore the corridors of the castle on their own. 

Content Courses

Students on semester programs carry a 14-17 credit hour course load per semester and choose 2-4 content courses/Area Studies courses taught in either English or French from a wide range of disciplines.

Study Abroad: 

Program Components

AMIDEAST host countries each have their own unique history and regional characteristics that influence our programs. AMIDEAST seeks to embrace these aspects and ensure an enriching experience abroad by promoting language acquisition, intercultural learning, cultural immersion, and focusing on the safety and security of our students.  

Study Abroad: 
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